I have always been fascinated by the power of genetics. Genetic variation shapes the biological world that we experience every day.

Biography 

I have always been fascinated by the power of genetics.  Genetic variation shapes the biological world that we experience every day.  My graduate work at Princeton University was in the field of behavioral genetics, studying associative learning in Drosophila.  At the time, the emerging picture of synaptic modulation focused on potassium channels, leading me to my postdoc training in the Jan lab at UCSF where I participated in cloning the Shaker locus and subsequently cloned the first mammalian voltage gated potassium channel, Kv1.1.  On moving to Seattle, I switched to mice because the mammalian auditory nervous system provided a more defined systems level connectivity, thereby providing a basis for integrating genetics and physiology at the cellular level with complex behavior (e.g. sound localization) at the level of the whole organism.  

I take serious interest in training the next generation of scientists.  I have mentored 17 graduate students, including two M.D./Ph.D. students. Several are still in training, but as of 2011, nine are in faculty/staff positions (at UCSF, Univ. of Washington(3), Washington State Univ., U.Texas Medical Center, Inst. for Systems Biology, and Seattle Children’s) and one is a VP for Research at Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceuticals.  Currently, I am mentoring 3 Ph.D. students from the Pharmacology and Neurobiology and Behavior programs as well as an M.D. student from NYU Medical School who is an HHMI Medical Research Fellow.

I have mentored 20 post-doctoral fellows. Among these, faculty and staff positions are held at U.W.(3), Stanford, U.Michigan., Genentech, Monash Univ. (Australia), Ludwig-Maximilians U (Germany), and Systems Biology Lab (Oxford,UK).  I have also mentored an M.D./Ph.D through the K99 portion of a K99/R00, now faculty in Pediatrics at U.W.  

Our current projects involve ongoing studies of the role of Kv channels in auditory processing; the role of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, PMCA2, in auditory transduction and transmission; and identifying genes involved in noise resistance and age-related hearing loss.

 

Overview 

Undergraduate Education: Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, WA.; B.S. Biology, 1978

Graduate Education: Princeton University, Princeton, NJ. MA 1980/PhD 1983 Neurobiology

Other Training: University of California at San Francisco; Postdoc, 1984-1988, Molec. Neurobiology

Awards and honors 

2010-2016: NIH Auditory System Study Section (AUD), Standing Member
2000-2005, ad-hoc 2007, 2011: NIDCD Board of Scientific Counselors (Reviews NIDCD intramural scientists)
2004: Visiting Scientist, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; with Dr. Jim Pickles.
1998, 2003: Medical Research Council (U.K.) Hearing Institute Review Committee
1991-1994: Klingenstein Fellow in the Neurosciences (Awarded to young faculty in Neuroscience)
1983-1985: American Cancer Society Post-doctoral Fellowship
1983: Donald B. Lindsley Award (Given by The Grass Foundation and the Society for Neurosciences in recognition of an outstanding thesis in behavioral neurobiology)
1978-1982: NSF Pre-doctoral Fellowship
1978-1982: Dunlop Prize (Princeton University award to outstanding graduate students)

Academic interests 

RESEARCH FOCUS

Our current projects involve ongoing studies of the role of Kv channels in auditory processing; the role of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, PMCA2, in auditory transduction and transmission; and identifying genes involved in noise resistance and age-related hearing loss.

 

Recent Publications

Minich RR, Li J, Tempel BL. Early growth response protein 1 regulates promoter activity of α-plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2, a major calcium pump in the brain and auditory system., BMC Mol. Biol. 2017 May; 18(1):14

Weatherstone JH, Kopp-Scheinpflug C, Pilati N, Wang Y, Forsythe ID, Rubel EW, Tempel BL. Maintenance of neuronal size gradient in MNTB requires sound-evoked activity., J. Neurophysiol. 2017 Feb; 117(2):756-766

Kopp-Scheinpflug C, Tempel BL. Decreased temporal precision of neuronal signaling as a candidate mechanism of auditory processing disorder., Hear. Res. 2015 Dec; 330(Pt B):213-20

Peguero B, Tempel BL. A Chromosome 17 Locus Engenders Frequency-Specific Non-Progressive Hearing Loss that Contributes to Age-Related Hearing Loss in Mice., J. Assoc. Res. Otolaryngol. 2015 Aug; 16(4):459-71

Street VA, Kujawa SG, Manichaikul A, Broman KW, Kallman JC, Shilling DJ, Iwata AJ, Robinson LC, Robbins CA, Li J, Liberman MC, Tempel BL. Resistance to noise-induced hearing loss in 129S6 and MOLF mice: identification of independent, overlapping, and interacting chromosomal regions., J. Assoc. Res. Otolaryngol. 2014 Oct; 15(5):721-38

Lab 

Tempel Lab

Our current projects involve ongoing studies of the role of Kv channels in auditory processing; the role of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, PMCA2, in auditory transduction and transmission; and identifying genes involved in noise resistance and age-related hearing loss.

TO LEARN MORE VISIT THE TEMPEL LAB WEBSITE

Lab contact info 

bltempel@uw.edu
(206) 616-4696

Lab location 

The V.M. Bloedel Hearing Research Center
University of Washington
Seattle, WA 98195